Tag: William Wordsworth

  • Wordsworth's connections to Grasmere

    Known for its beautfiul walks and breath – taking landscapes the Lake District is also famous for its connections with lake poet William Wordsworth. His connections to the lakes can be found in the bustling village of Grasmere. Below are some attractions and points of interest located in or near Grasmere which were part of Wordsworth’s life.

    Wordsworth House and Gardens

    William Wordsworth was born on 7th April 1770 in a fine Georgian house known today as Wordsworth House. William lived in the house with his father, three brothers and younger sister Dorothy. The house today has been turned into a National Trust tourist attraction where visitors can step back in time to William’s childhood home.

    To find out more about Wordsworth House and plan your visit click the link provided:

    https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/wordsworth-house

    Wordsworth House - Cockermouth

    Dove Cottage

    The first home of William Wordsworth and his sister Dorothy between 1799 - 1808. Dorothy become William’s secretary to enable the poet to pursue and dedicate his life to poetry. In 1802 William married his childhood sweetheart Mary Hutchinson and the first of their five children were born.

    To find out more about Dove Cottage and plan your visit click the link provided:

    https://wordsworth.org.uk/

    Dove Cottage - Grasmere

    Allan Bank

    As the family grew Wordsworth moved to Allan Bank in 1808. Here they lived for two years, a large house that William had condemned as ugly when it was being built.

    To find out more about Allan Bank and plan your visit click the link provided:

    https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/allan-bank-and-grasmere

    Allan Bank - Grasmere

    The Old Rectory

    While living in Allan Bank Wordsworth and his family also lived with Samuel Taylor Coleridge and Mary’s sister Sarah. Things soon became crowded and soot from the chimneys kept getting on the furniture. In 1811 the family moved to The Old Rectory in Grasmere.

    Rydal Mount

    Wordsworth moved to Rydal Mount in 1813 after his two youngest children died while living in The Old Rectory. William and Mary stayed at the house until their deaths in 1850 and 1859. Whilst living at Rydal Mount William became Distributor of Stamps for Westmorland with an office in Church Street in Ambleside. In 1820 he published his ‘Guide through the District of the Lakes’ and became the Poet Laureate.

    To find out more about Rydal Mount click the link provided:

    https://www.visitcumbria.com/amb/rydal-mount/

    Rydal Mount - Rydal

    St Oswald’s Church

    St Oswald’s Church is where William and his wife are buried.

    To find out more about St Oswald’s Church and plan your visit click the link provided:

    https://www.visitcumbria.com/amb/grasmere-st-oswalds-church/

    William and Mary's tombstones at St Oswald's Church

    St Oswald's Church

    Wordsworth wrote over 70,000 lines of verse which is 40,000 lines more than any other poet. One of his most famous poems is ‘I wandered lonely as a cloud’. The poem is commonly known as “Daffodils” and explores the poet’s relationship with nature, and how the memory of the daffodils dancing comforts him whenever he recalls them.

    To see more of Wordsworth’s poems visit

    https://interestingliterature.com/2017/03/06/10-of-the-best-william-wordsworth-poems-everyone-should-read/

  • Who was William Wordsworth

    Known for its beautiful walks and breath – taking landscapes the Lake District is also famous for its connections with lake poet William Wordsworth. His connections to the lakes can be found in the bustling village of Grasmere.

    William Wordsworth was born on 7th April 1770 in a fine Georgian house in Cockermouth, which is now known as Wordsworth House. William was one of four children with two brothers and sister Dorothy.

    Wordsworth House - Home of William Wordsworth - Cockermouth

    Much of William’s childhood was spent in Cockermouth and Penrith where he attended infant school. Attending infant school with William was his soon to be wife Mary Hutchinson. William attended the Grammar School in Hawkshead, where he received encouragement from his headmaster to read and write poetry. During this time, he made regular visits to the countryside to gather inspiration from nature. Pursing his career in poetry he attended St. Johns College in Cambridge, where he received a bequest of £900. This gave him the means to pursue his chosen career.

    In 1797 the Wordsworths stayed in Alfoxden House, where they met Samuel Taylor Coleridge and Robert Southey. In the years to follow a relationship between William and Coleridge grew. Soon after William and Coleridge undertook a tour of the lakes, starting at Temple Sowerby and finishing at Wasdale Head, via Grasmere. While in Grasmere they noticed Dove Cottage and an empty Inn called the Dove and Olive Branch.

    Dove Cottage - Grasmere

    Shortly after William and Dorothy moved into Dove Cottage, where they lived for the next nine years. Dorothy became William’s secretary as William dedicated his career and life to poetry. In 1802 William married Mary Hutchinson, and the first of their five children were born shortly after. The family outgrew Dove Cottage, so they moved to Allan Bank for two years, and then on to Rydal Mount.

    Allan Bank - Grasmere

    Rydal Mount - Rydal

    William died in 1850 and Marty in 1859. Both William and Mary’s tombstones can be found in the churchyard of St. Oswald’s Church in the centre of Grasmere.

    Tombstones of William and Mary Wordsworth

    Wordsworth wrote over 70,000 lines of verse which is more than 40,000 lines more than any other poet. One of his most famous poems is ‘I wondered lonely as a cloud’. The poem is commongly known as daffodils and explores the poet’s friendship with nature, and how the memory of daffodils dancing cheers him up whenever he recalls them. Other poems include ‘Composed under Westminster Bridge’, ‘London 1802’, and ‘Tintern Abbey’.

    To see more of Wordsworth’s visit https://interestingliterature.com/2017/03/06/10-of-the-best-william-wordsworth-poems-everyone-should-read/

    Most of Wandsworth’s connections to Grasmere such as Dove cottage, Allan Bank, and Wordsworth House have been turned into museums or a National Trust attraction. Feel free to explore them on your next visit to the lakes, where you will find links for them below.

    Dove Cottage: https://wordsworth.org.uk/

    Allan Bank: https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/allan-bank-and-grasmere

    Wordsworth House and Garden: https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/wordsworth-house

  • An insight into the village of Grasmere

    Located in the beautiful village of Grasmere, Greens is surrounded by some beautiful views and landmarks for you to explore. Grasmere is located in the centre of the English Lake District and sits on the River Rothay that flows into the village.

    Known for its beautiful lakes and home to lake poets the village is known as the home to William Wordsworth.  Living in Grasmere for 14 years Wordsworth described the village as the “loveliest spot that man hath found”.  Living in Dove Cottage for nine years Wordsworth wrote much of his poetry in the cottage which is known today. The cottage today has been turned into a museum which is open to visitors who can get an vivid impression of what day to day life was like for Wordsworth.

    Dove Cottage

    Keeping with tradition Grasmere celebrates a number of events throughout the year such as the Rushbearing Festival and Grasmere Sports. Both take place  every year and are celebrated by people in the village who are keen to keep the traditions alive.

    Rush maidens taking part in the Rushbearing Festival

    The Rushbearing Festival originated when rushes were laid on the church floors during the day and evening as the church floor was too earthy in the winter. We recently did a blog on the Rushbearing festival which you can look at here http://greensgrasmere.com/2018/07/12/rushbearing-festival-with-mary-bower/

    Participants taking part in Grasmere Sports

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Grasmere sports takes place in August and was first held in 1952. It is one of the most popular events in the lakes and consists of Cumberland wrestling, fell running and hound trials.

    Grasmere Is also home to the famous ‘Grasmere gingerbread’ which is made using a “secret recipe” created by Sarah Nelson. By the early nineteenth century the gingerbread was being sold as ‘fairings’ which were very popular with those living in the village. Sarah Nelson’s famous Grasmere gingerbread can be found at The Grasmere Gingerbread Shop in the village. The staff are all dressed in victorian clothes where you can buy Grasmere gingerbread and other ginger themed gifts.

    Sarah Nelson's Grasmere Gingerbread

    In and surrounding the village are a number of walks and landmarks for you to explore. Grasmere Lake is one of the smaller lakes in the Lake District and gives its name to the village of Grasmere.

    Grasmere Lake

    Within walking distance from the café is a walk to Easedale Tarn. A 5.5 mile walk which is situated high in the upper valley of Easedale. To the south of the tarn is the long ridge of Blea Rigg. During Victorian times it was even more popular than it was today. A refreshment hut used to ply a good old trade but little remains now just a few scattered stones. The tarn is about 21m deep, with it's outfall tumbling down some lovely waterfalls which are situated right beside the path.

    Easedale Tarn

    Map of Easedale Tarn

    If you would like to find out more about Grasmere visit: https://www.visitcumbria.com/amb/grasmere/. We hope you enjoy your visit to Grasmere just as we do.

    Here at Greens we are open every day from 9:30am – 5pm except Thursdays. Why not pop in and see us on your next visit to the village, we’ll be waiting to serve you some refreshing beverages and homemade treats off our menu. To keep up to date with our opening hours visit  http://greensgrasmere.com/find-us-vegan-cafe/