Tag: walks

  • The Coffin Route

    Take in the stunning views of Rydal Water and Grasmere with a walk along the coffin route.

     The coffin route is a short walk that circles Grasmere and Rydal water. Taking you high above the fells the walk encounters lovely views of Rydal water and Grasmere.

    Rydal water is one of the smallest lakes in the Lake District but is very popular with visitors and locals due to its’s Wordsworth connections. Steps leading up to the western end of the lake come across ‘Wordsworth’s seat’ a viewpoint favoured by the poet. Walking around Rydal water you will come across Dove Cottage and Rydal Mount, both homes to William Wordsworth. Grasmere is one of Cumbria’s most popular villages with gift shops, places to eat, and places to stay. The village is known for its connections to lake poet William Wordswortrh who lived in the village with his sister Dorothy for nine years.

    The walk gets it’s title as it was the route used to convey coffins on their final journey to St. Oswald’s Church in Grasmere. The route these days is a little livelier with pleasant views along the way.

    For a further insight into this walk, including directions please visit:

    https://www.walklakes.co.uk/walk_76.html

  • Loughrigg Tarn

    Take in the stunning views of the Langdale Pikes with a walk to Loughrigg Tarn.

    On route to Loughrigg Tarn you will come across the other side of Loughrigg Fell. The walk has some stunning views of The Langdale Pikes, Helm Crag, Windermere and Rydal Caves.

    The Langdale Pikes can be seen within the surrounding hills of Langdale. Loved by walkers and Alfred Wainwright the Pikes include Pavey Ark, Thunacar Knot, Pike of Stickle and Harrison Stickle. Helm Crag is situated to the north of Grasmere and is perfect for those who enjoy a shorter walk. The rocks on the summit have various names “The Lion and Lamb”, “The Howitzer” or “The Old Lady Playing the Organ”.

    Rydal Caves are situated on Loughrigg Fell and are a man-made cavern which was known as Loughrigg Quarry. Over a hundred years ago the caves were a busy working quarry supplying high quality roofing slates to the people in the village.

    As well as being loved by those visiting or living in the lakes Loughrigg Tarn was a favoured place of the poet William Wordsworth.

    For a further insight into this walk, including directions please visit:

    https://www.walklakes.co.uk/walk_140.html

  • Loughrigg Fell

    Located in the beautiful Lake District we are lucky to be surrounded by a number of breath-taking walks such as Loughrigg Fell.

     Loughrigg Fell is on the outskirts of Ambleside and is a perfect walk for superb views over Grasmere and Rydal water. The fell is surrounded by open water and the River Rothay can be seen to the north.

    Starting in the popular town of Ambleside the walk takes you over the top of Loughrigg Fell, along the airy Loughrigg Terrace and the permissive path to Rydal Cave.

    Rydal Cave is a man made quarry which is known for its’s high quality roofing slates in the 19thcentury. The cave today is visited frequently by walkers who are advised to take care as in recent years rocks have started to fall from the ceiling. Over two hundred years ago the cave was a busy quarry known as Loughrigg Quarry.

    For a further insight into this walk, including directions please visit:

    https://www.walklakes.co.uk/walk_141.html

  • Launchy Gill

    Take in the sounds of a cascading waterfall with a walk to Launchy Gill waterfall.

     This is short walk to the waterfalls of Launchy Gill on the west side of Thirlmere reservoir. Thirlmere reservoir is home to Thirlmere lake which was originally two small lakes after it was purchased in 1889. Since then the area has had a dam which has led Thirlmere to become one vast resovior. In the process the settlements of Armboth and Wythburn were submerged with only one building remaining.

    The best time to see Launchy Gill is after a heavy down pour of rain where the water cascades down the waterfall. Although do take care as the stones and path can become slippery in wet conditions.

    In more calm conditions the waterfall and the surrounding landscape would be a good place to explore. Just after the bridge higher on the hill side is an interesting looking boulder that is known as ‘The Tottling Stone’. The stone stands out from the tress and is well known to those who visit Thirlmere and its reservoir.

    For a further insight into this walk, including directions please visit:

    https://www.walklakes.co.uk/walk_95.html

     

     

  • Alcock Tarn

    Located in the beautiful Lake District we are lucky to be surrounded by a number of breath-taking walks such as Alcock Tarn.

    A short and steep walk the tarn is located high above the fells. The tarn lies behind a small crag called Grey Crag perched on the other side of Grasmere. While walking in the fells it isn’t unusual to come across crags.

    Alcock tarn is just 2m deep which is shallow compared to other tarns within the lakes. Originally known as Butter Crags Tarn it was enlarged in Victorian times by Mr Alcock of Hollins in Grasmere who stocked the tarn with brown trout.

    Getting to Alcock Tarn can be difficult in some places but worthwhile when reaching the summit. The walk passes some stunning views and landmarks such as The Wordsworth Trust Shop and Dove Cottage. Both the shop and the cottage are dedicated to the life and work of poet William Wordsworth.

    For a further insight into this walk, including directions please visit:

    https://www.walklakes.co.uk/walk_73.html