Tag: GRASMERE

  • Stockghyll Force - Ambleside

    Located in the beautiful Lake District we are lucky to be surrounded by a number of breath-taking waterfalls such as Stockghyll Force.

     A short and sweet walk from the heart of Ambleside. The waterfall is known as a hidden gem where it is invisible on a map but easy to find if you know the way. The stream that starts the walk can be found next door to Cunningham’s outdoor shop located in Ambleside.

    Stockghyll force flows into the River Rothay which drains eventually into Windermere. Windermere has a heavenly industrialised past and used to be nicknamed Rattle Rhyll. Many of the old mill buildings can still be seen in Ambleside with some of them now seen as local shops. The old mill buildings used to produce bobbins for silk and cotton thread in the process of making wool.

    To find the falls can be difficult to find although a friendly local will be more than happy to point you in the right direction.

    For a further insight into this walk, including directions please visit:

    https://www.walklakes.co.uk/walk_132.html

  • Grasmere and Rydal Water

    Located in the bustling village of Grasmere we are surrounded by a number of walks for you to explore.

    On this walk come across some stunning views and landmarks of Grasmere and Rydal water. The walk takes you on The Coffin Route which was the route taken to carry the dead to St Oswald’s church in Grasmere. Grasmere is one of the most popular villages in the lakes and is home to lake poet William Wordsworth.

    Rydal water is one of the smallest lakes in the Lake District but makes up for it with its connections to lake poet William Wordsworth. Steps leading up to the lake come across ‘Wordsworth’s seat’ a favourite viewpoint of Wordsworths. The lake is tightly enclosed between the steep slopes of Loughrigg Fell and the Fairfield Forceshoe.

    For a further insight into this walk and directions please visit

    https://www.walklakes.co.uk/walk_76.html

  • Silver How

    Have a couple of hours spare or want to make the most of the weather, why not take a walk to Silver How.

    Starting from Grasmere village the walk passes by Allan Bank, the temporary home of poet William Wordsworth and his family. On route climb through towering juniper bushes and cross a high plateau taking in the stunning views of The Langdale Pikes, Bow Fell and the Band, Pike of Bisco, and Helm Crag. Bow Fell is one of the popular fells which features a circular route via the Band. Pike of Bisco lies between the summit of Wrynose Pass and the Oxendale branch of Great Langdale. The northwest end of the summit once had a large cairn but now a much smaller cairn stands in its place.

    For a further insight into this walk, including directions please visit:

    https://www.walklakes.co.uk/walk_54.html

  • The Coffin Route

    Take in the stunning views of Rydal Water and Grasmere with a walk along the coffin route.

     The coffin route is a short walk that circles Grasmere and Rydal water. Taking you high above the fells the walk encounters lovely views of Rydal water and Grasmere.

    Rydal water is one of the smallest lakes in the Lake District but is very popular with visitors and locals due to its’s Wordsworth connections. Steps leading up to the western end of the lake come across ‘Wordsworth’s seat’ a viewpoint favoured by the poet. Walking around Rydal water you will come across Dove Cottage and Rydal Mount, both homes to William Wordsworth. Grasmere is one of Cumbria’s most popular villages with gift shops, places to eat, and places to stay. The village is known for its connections to lake poet William Wordswortrh who lived in the village with his sister Dorothy for nine years.

    The walk gets it’s title as it was the route used to convey coffins on their final journey to St. Oswald’s Church in Grasmere. The route these days is a little livelier with pleasant views along the way.

    For a further insight into this walk, including directions please visit:

    https://www.walklakes.co.uk/walk_76.html

  • Wordsworth's connections to Grasmere

    Known for its beautfiul walks and breath – taking landscapes the Lake District is also famous for its connections with lake poet William Wordsworth. His connections to the lakes can be found in the bustling village of Grasmere. Below are some attractions and points of interest located in or near Grasmere which were part of Wordsworth’s life.

    Wordsworth House and Gardens

    William Wordsworth was born on 7th April 1770 in a fine Georgian house known today as Wordsworth House. William lived in the house with his father, three brothers and younger sister Dorothy. The house today has been turned into a National Trust tourist attraction where visitors can step back in time to William’s childhood home.

    To find out more about Wordsworth House and plan your visit click the link provided:

    https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/wordsworth-house

    Wordsworth House - Cockermouth

    Dove Cottage

    The first home of William Wordsworth and his sister Dorothy between 1799 - 1808. Dorothy become William’s secretary to enable the poet to pursue and dedicate his life to poetry. In 1802 William married his childhood sweetheart Mary Hutchinson and the first of their five children were born.

    To find out more about Dove Cottage and plan your visit click the link provided:

    https://wordsworth.org.uk/

    Dove Cottage - Grasmere

    Allan Bank

    As the family grew Wordsworth moved to Allan Bank in 1808. Here they lived for two years, a large house that William had condemned as ugly when it was being built.

    To find out more about Allan Bank and plan your visit click the link provided:

    https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/allan-bank-and-grasmere

    Allan Bank - Grasmere

    The Old Rectory

    While living in Allan Bank Wordsworth and his family also lived with Samuel Taylor Coleridge and Mary’s sister Sarah. Things soon became crowded and soot from the chimneys kept getting on the furniture. In 1811 the family moved to The Old Rectory in Grasmere.

    Rydal Mount

    Wordsworth moved to Rydal Mount in 1813 after his two youngest children died while living in The Old Rectory. William and Mary stayed at the house until their deaths in 1850 and 1859. Whilst living at Rydal Mount William became Distributor of Stamps for Westmorland with an office in Church Street in Ambleside. In 1820 he published his ‘Guide through the District of the Lakes’ and became the Poet Laureate.

    To find out more about Rydal Mount click the link provided:

    https://www.visitcumbria.com/amb/rydal-mount/

    Rydal Mount - Rydal

    St Oswald’s Church

    St Oswald’s Church is where William and his wife are buried.

    To find out more about St Oswald’s Church and plan your visit click the link provided:

    https://www.visitcumbria.com/amb/grasmere-st-oswalds-church/

    William and Mary's tombstones at St Oswald's Church

    St Oswald's Church

    Wordsworth wrote over 70,000 lines of verse which is 40,000 lines more than any other poet. One of his most famous poems is ‘I wandered lonely as a cloud’. The poem is commonly known as “Daffodils” and explores the poet’s relationship with nature, and how the memory of the daffodils dancing comforts him whenever he recalls them.

    To see more of Wordsworth’s poems visit

    https://interestingliterature.com/2017/03/06/10-of-the-best-william-wordsworth-poems-everyone-should-read/

  • Who was William Wordsworth

    Known for its beautiful walks and breath – taking landscapes the Lake District is also famous for its connections with lake poet William Wordsworth. His connections to the lakes can be found in the bustling village of Grasmere.

    William Wordsworth was born on 7th April 1770 in a fine Georgian house in Cockermouth, which is now known as Wordsworth House. William was one of four children with two brothers and sister Dorothy.

    Wordsworth House - Home of William Wordsworth - Cockermouth

    Much of William’s childhood was spent in Cockermouth and Penrith where he attended infant school. Attending infant school with William was his soon to be wife Mary Hutchinson. William attended the Grammar School in Hawkshead, where he received encouragement from his headmaster to read and write poetry. During this time, he made regular visits to the countryside to gather inspiration from nature. Pursing his career in poetry he attended St. Johns College in Cambridge, where he received a bequest of £900. This gave him the means to pursue his chosen career.

    In 1797 the Wordsworths stayed in Alfoxden House, where they met Samuel Taylor Coleridge and Robert Southey. In the years to follow a relationship between William and Coleridge grew. Soon after William and Coleridge undertook a tour of the lakes, starting at Temple Sowerby and finishing at Wasdale Head, via Grasmere. While in Grasmere they noticed Dove Cottage and an empty Inn called the Dove and Olive Branch.

    Dove Cottage - Grasmere

    Shortly after William and Dorothy moved into Dove Cottage, where they lived for the next nine years. Dorothy became William’s secretary as William dedicated his career and life to poetry. In 1802 William married Mary Hutchinson, and the first of their five children were born shortly after. The family outgrew Dove Cottage, so they moved to Allan Bank for two years, and then on to Rydal Mount.

    Allan Bank - Grasmere

    Rydal Mount - Rydal

    William died in 1850 and Marty in 1859. Both William and Mary’s tombstones can be found in the churchyard of St. Oswald’s Church in the centre of Grasmere.

    Tombstones of William and Mary Wordsworth

    Wordsworth wrote over 70,000 lines of verse which is more than 40,000 lines more than any other poet. One of his most famous poems is ‘I wondered lonely as a cloud’. The poem is commongly known as daffodils and explores the poet’s friendship with nature, and how the memory of daffodils dancing cheers him up whenever he recalls them. Other poems include ‘Composed under Westminster Bridge’, ‘London 1802’, and ‘Tintern Abbey’.

    To see more of Wordsworth’s visit https://interestingliterature.com/2017/03/06/10-of-the-best-william-wordsworth-poems-everyone-should-read/

    Most of Wandsworth’s connections to Grasmere such as Dove cottage, Allan Bank, and Wordsworth House have been turned into museums or a National Trust attraction. Feel free to explore them on your next visit to the lakes, where you will find links for them below.

    Dove Cottage: https://wordsworth.org.uk/

    Allan Bank: https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/allan-bank-and-grasmere

    Wordsworth House and Garden: https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/wordsworth-house

  • Loughrigg Tarn

    Take in the stunning views of the Langdale Pikes with a walk to Loughrigg Tarn.

    On route to Loughrigg Tarn you will come across the other side of Loughrigg Fell. The walk has some stunning views of The Langdale Pikes, Helm Crag, Windermere and Rydal Caves.

    The Langdale Pikes can be seen within the surrounding hills of Langdale. Loved by walkers and Alfred Wainwright the Pikes include Pavey Ark, Thunacar Knot, Pike of Stickle and Harrison Stickle. Helm Crag is situated to the north of Grasmere and is perfect for those who enjoy a shorter walk. The rocks on the summit have various names “The Lion and Lamb”, “The Howitzer” or “The Old Lady Playing the Organ”.

    Rydal Caves are situated on Loughrigg Fell and are a man-made cavern which was known as Loughrigg Quarry. Over a hundred years ago the caves were a busy working quarry supplying high quality roofing slates to the people in the village.

    As well as being loved by those visiting or living in the lakes Loughrigg Tarn was a favoured place of the poet William Wordsworth.

    For a further insight into this walk, including directions please visit:

    https://www.walklakes.co.uk/walk_140.html

  • Loughrigg Fell

    Located in the beautiful Lake District we are lucky to be surrounded by a number of breath-taking walks such as Loughrigg Fell.

     Loughrigg Fell is on the outskirts of Ambleside and is a perfect walk for superb views over Grasmere and Rydal water. The fell is surrounded by open water and the River Rothay can be seen to the north.

    Starting in the popular town of Ambleside the walk takes you over the top of Loughrigg Fell, along the airy Loughrigg Terrace and the permissive path to Rydal Cave.

    Rydal Cave is a man made quarry which is known for its’s high quality roofing slates in the 19thcentury. The cave today is visited frequently by walkers who are advised to take care as in recent years rocks have started to fall from the ceiling. Over two hundred years ago the cave was a busy quarry known as Loughrigg Quarry.

    For a further insight into this walk, including directions please visit:

    https://www.walklakes.co.uk/walk_141.html

  • Launchy Gill

    Take in the sounds of a cascading waterfall with a walk to Launchy Gill waterfall.

     This is short walk to the waterfalls of Launchy Gill on the west side of Thirlmere reservoir. Thirlmere reservoir is home to Thirlmere lake which was originally two small lakes after it was purchased in 1889. Since then the area has had a dam which has led Thirlmere to become one vast resovior. In the process the settlements of Armboth and Wythburn were submerged with only one building remaining.

    The best time to see Launchy Gill is after a heavy down pour of rain where the water cascades down the waterfall. Although do take care as the stones and path can become slippery in wet conditions.

    In more calm conditions the waterfall and the surrounding landscape would be a good place to explore. Just after the bridge higher on the hill side is an interesting looking boulder that is known as ‘The Tottling Stone’. The stone stands out from the tress and is well known to those who visit Thirlmere and its reservoir.

    For a further insight into this walk, including directions please visit:

    https://www.walklakes.co.uk/walk_95.html

     

     

  • Alcock Tarn

    Located in the beautiful Lake District we are lucky to be surrounded by a number of breath-taking walks such as Alcock Tarn.

    A short and steep walk the tarn is located high above the fells. The tarn lies behind a small crag called Grey Crag perched on the other side of Grasmere. While walking in the fells it isn’t unusual to come across crags.

    Alcock tarn is just 2m deep which is shallow compared to other tarns within the lakes. Originally known as Butter Crags Tarn it was enlarged in Victorian times by Mr Alcock of Hollins in Grasmere who stocked the tarn with brown trout.

    Getting to Alcock Tarn can be difficult in some places but worthwhile when reaching the summit. The walk passes some stunning views and landmarks such as The Wordsworth Trust Shop and Dove Cottage. Both the shop and the cottage are dedicated to the life and work of poet William Wordsworth.

    For a further insight into this walk, including directions please visit:

    https://www.walklakes.co.uk/walk_73.html