Wordsworth's connections to Grasmere

Known for its beautfiul walks and breath – taking landscapes the Lake District is also famous for its connections with lake poet William Wordsworth. His connections to the lakes can be found in the bustling village of Grasmere. Below are some attractions and points of interest located in or near Grasmere which were part of Wordsworth’s life.

Wordsworth House and Gardens

William Wordsworth was born on 7th April 1770 in a fine Georgian house known today as Wordsworth House. William lived in the house with his father, three brothers and younger sister Dorothy. The house today has been turned into a National Trust tourist attraction where visitors can step back in time to William’s childhood home.

To find out more about Wordsworth House and plan your visit click the link provided:

https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/wordsworth-house

Wordsworth House - Cockermouth

Dove Cottage

The first home of William Wordsworth and his sister Dorothy between 1799 - 1808. Dorothy become William’s secretary to enable the poet to pursue and dedicate his life to poetry. In 1802 William married his childhood sweetheart Mary Hutchinson and the first of their five children were born.

To find out more about Dove Cottage and plan your visit click the link provided:

https://wordsworth.org.uk/

Dove Cottage - Grasmere

Allan Bank

As the family grew Wordsworth moved to Allan Bank in 1808. Here they lived for two years, a large house that William had condemned as ugly when it was being built.

To find out more about Allan Bank and plan your visit click the link provided:

https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/allan-bank-and-grasmere

Allan Bank - Grasmere

The Old Rectory

While living in Allan Bank Wordsworth and his family also lived with Samuel Taylor Coleridge and Mary’s sister Sarah. Things soon became crowded and soot from the chimneys kept getting on the furniture. In 1811 the family moved to The Old Rectory in Grasmere.

Rydal Mount

Wordsworth moved to Rydal Mount in 1813 after his two youngest children died while living in The Old Rectory. William and Mary stayed at the house until their deaths in 1850 and 1859. Whilst living at Rydal Mount William became Distributor of Stamps for Westmorland with an office in Church Street in Ambleside. In 1820 he published his ‘Guide through the District of the Lakes’ and became the Poet Laureate.

To find out more about Rydal Mount click the link provided:

https://www.visitcumbria.com/amb/rydal-mount/

Rydal Mount - Rydal

St Oswald’s Church

St Oswald’s Church is where William and his wife are buried.

To find out more about St Oswald’s Church and plan your visit click the link provided:

https://www.visitcumbria.com/amb/grasmere-st-oswalds-church/

William and Mary's tombstones at St Oswald's Church

St Oswald's Church

Wordsworth wrote over 70,000 lines of verse which is 40,000 lines more than any other poet. One of his most famous poems is ‘I wandered lonely as a cloud’. The poem is commonly known as “Daffodils” and explores the poet’s relationship with nature, and how the memory of the daffodils dancing comforts him whenever he recalls them.

To see more of Wordsworth’s poems visit

https://interestingliterature.com/2017/03/06/10-of-the-best-william-wordsworth-poems-everyone-should-read/